Sex and the City Uncovered

Sex and the City Uncovered - Marian Jordan I found out about this book by reading the advertisements on the back of the toilet stall walls in a hall at my university. It really pulled me in solely because it exposed the media. The author actually came to speak at my university, but for some reason or another, I didn't go. I honestly thought that the book would have been a bit different, but it's a bit simple minded. When I first read it, all I could think of was the Condescending Willie meme saying, "Tell me more." Many times my brain responded to the writing with "Well, no, duuuuh!" I don't mean to disrespect the author, but my thoughts were quite mean because I'm not her targeted audience. It's more geared towards college-aged women who actually keep up with today's media. The language is very casual, and it sounds like it's written by someone for someone who's very active in the social world.The author approached the topic of media affecting people through a religious point of view. More specifically, she details her struggle and points out how the show Sex and the City can mislead some people into thinking it's a great lifestyle without problems. I honestly thought it would have more scientific facts, but it focuses more on a woman's relationship with God. Sometimes the examples she uses are a bit extreme, and she doesn't address the middle ground. Let's just say sometimes social drinking doesn't always lead to out of control hooking up and drug abuse and may not lead to emptiness. I also think that the author makes too many generalizations about women wanting to feel needed or desired by men to have worth. It's true that society, especially the media, places a lot of emphasis on women's beauty, but personally, I've never felt that being wanted by men makes me a woman. Sometimes it was hard for me to place myself in the shoes of her audience and actually accept her advice.Overall, the book in itself is pretty complete, and the best part is that the author reminds every woman that she is worth something. I'd recommend it to young Christian women who want relationships, intimacy, friendships, and a place to belong. It's great that it warns women about the dangers of believing the media, but I think it sort of sells itself short solely relying on God. It'd be a lot more convincing if she cited more studies about the damaging effects of media and then mentioned how a pathway to God can help heal the damage. Either way, it made me consider my distant relationship with God and made me question if I was walking the right path although I'm not a party girl or an empty girl. The book does have some value, especially if it's read by the right audience.