Cooking Light: Annual Recipes

Cooking Light Annual Recipes 1999 - Cooking Light Magazine To begin with, the opening of the story is weak. It's easy to predict what happens and is stereotypical. Things feel forced together, not meshing until later. The main protagonist is a pain. She's the kind of student I hate to be in class with because she's wasting her time and yet blames it on the school, not taking responsibility for her actions. Later on, she does change a bit, so I understand why she acts the way she does in a literary sense. Still, she's kind of unbearable at first. It's quite stereotypical that she acts this way at school because she has a poor family life. It seems like the author has almost turned this main character into a statistic.The scene with Jared on the beach is way too forced. I almost stopped reading at that scene because it was too obvious something was going on. It was really annoying how everything was just out in the open. The author writes more in the telling style than she does in the showing style.The book didn't draw me in until the later forest scenes. Sure, some of it is a bit unbelievable and too fast paced, but the writing is much better than in the beginning. The book lacks in-depth descriptions of the settings, so it becomes confusing at times. There are a lot of inconsistencies with the characters and that does detract from the reading experience. Maybe it's because I've read and watched a lot of fantasy things, but the book is very predictable to the point that I rolled my eyes when the main character finally realized what was going on.My favorite character is Tony. He seems like a well developed character and not that stereotypical although his physical description is stereotypical. I'd love to have him as a best friend. He's very much an in-control character, which is what I loved about him. I'm really glad he and the main character don't fall in love. That'd be too stereotypical, falling in love with your best guy friend.I think most of the characters are a little flat. For instance, Spike smiles, has tatoos, and is the carefree "badboy" (which he's not at all. Jayne is delusional), Flinn is a redneck who wants beer, and Chase is the strong silent type awkward with emotions. That's way too stereotypical and common. These characters have a lot of potential that doesn't develop well in the first book.Sometimes, I think these characters are insane. They break into laughter over things that aren't funny at all. I don't understand the placement of those parts, except maybe to show how desperate they are. Jayne is a pinwheel of emotions. I understand that she acts very much like a high schooler would, but I'm not sure if her emotions should realistically flipflop that much. To me, her emotions become too far flung to be taken seriously. I think she's a bit different from the usual female protagonist, but I wish someone would take her brain, tie it up, and keep her thoughts straight. Her sidetracked thoughts interrupt the flow of the story.Overall, the Kindle edition has tons of grammatical errors. They keep staring me in the face, annoying the heck out of me. There are missing commas, misplaced commas, and misspelled words. I think the author needs to check her work or get a better editor. I felt like I was reading a rough draft.The story had a Hunger Games feel to it, except I think this book is much better than The Hunger Games. Although I don't particularly like the main character, I didn't want her to die like I wanted Katniss to. This particular story is geared towards older high school students. This is a book that will probably never make it to any high school library due to the language and implied sexual themes. Honestly, the author does a good job at getting into the mind of a teenager, but by doing that, she has reduced the audience to people who are ok with vulgarity.If you enjoyed The Hunger Games, then you'll probably like this book. However, be warned, this book contains lots of curse words. It's not as kosher as The Hunger Games